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00:00:03 - Involvement in CORE / involvement as a student

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Partial Transcript: My name is Edward Owens. I'm working with the Urban League on the oral black history project.

Segment Synopsis: K. and L. Jones discuss their initial involvement with CORE and K. Jones talks about her involvement with CORE as a student at the University of Kentucky. They also mention various professors, including Dr. Lewis Smith, who were involved in CORE.

Keywords: Activist; CORE (Congress of Racial Equality); Civil rights movement; College of the Bible; Demonstrations; Desegregating public places; Desegregation; Dr. Lewis Smith; Non-violent movement; Pleasant Green Baptist Church; Political activism; Race relations; Racial tension; Segregation; Social activism; Student activism; Teacher involvement; UK

Subjects: African Americans--Civil rights--Kentucky; Civil rights movements--United States; University of Kentucky.

00:08:13 - Impact of first downtown demonstration / strategy planning

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Partial Transcript: We're talking about the years when, when, you know, CORE took what you might call a great leap forward...

Segment Synopsis: L. Jones talks about the impact of the first CORE demonstration in Lexington. He mentions that it got some media attention and he was the de facto spokesperson of the demonstration. He also shares the story in which they used "strategy planning" to get around the attempts implemented by H.L. Green to keep the demonstrators out of the store.

Keywords: CORE activities; Civil rights movement; H.L Green Company (Lexington, Ky.); Media attention; Pleasant Green Baptist Church; Political activism; Reverend A.B. Lee; Reverend W.A. Jones; Sit-ins; Social activism; Strategy planning; Student involvement

Subjects: African Americans--Civil rights--Kentucky; Civil rights demonstrations; Civil rights--Kentucky

00:14:31 - Black community support / employment with bus service / white community opposition

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Partial Transcript: How did the black community view CORE as an organization?

Segment Synopsis: L. Jones discusses the support of the black community, particularly when CORE was boycotting white owned businesses. He also talks about CORE's efforts to desegregate the local bus service. He goes on to talk about the indifference of the white community. K. Jones also discusses the efforts of the Lexington Committee on Human Relations.

Keywords: Black community support; Boycotts; Busing situation; CORE (Congress of Racial Equality); Civil rights movement; Dime stores; Indifference; Inequality in employment; Julia Lewis; Laura Massie; Lexington's white community; Local bus service; Political activism; Race relations; Racial opposition; Racial tension; Social activism; White organizations

Subjects: African Americans--Civil rights--Kentucky; Civil rights--Kentucky; Discrimination in employment

00:21:34 - Story about his arrest / being non-violent

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Partial Transcript: Oh, I, I'll give you an interesting little, uh, little anecdote...

Segment Synopsis: L. Jones talks about a time when he was arrested at the Kentucky Theater. K. Jones discusses what being non-violent meant and the preparations they went through before demonstrations with CORE.

Keywords: CORE (Congress of Racial Equality); CORE activities; Civil rights movement; Demonstrations; Direct non-violence action; Influence of Martin Luther King; Judge Richard Moloney; Kentucky Theater; Non-violent workshops; Political activism; Preparations; Social activism

Subjects: African Americans--Civil rights--Kentucky

00:26:10 - Boycotting downtown businesses

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Partial Transcript: And then beyond that we got into the economic phase of desegregation...

Segment Synopsis: K. and L. Jones discuss the march downtown and the boycott on downtown businesses. They also talk about the youth that were active in the civil rights movement in Lexington, including Ronald Berry.

Keywords: "Negro" hymns; Boycotts; Church involvement; Church leadership; Church support; Civil rights leadership; Civil rights movement; Civil rights songs; Floyd Mckissick; James Farmer; Joe Graves; Leading the march; Pleasant Green Baptist Church; Protest marches; Reverend W.A. Jones; Ronald Berry; Segregation; Segregation in jobs; Youth participation

Subjects: African Americans--Civil rights--Kentucky; African Americans--Employment--Kentucky--Lexington; Civil rights--Kentucky; Discrimination in employment

00:33:42 - Boycotting downtown businesses continued

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Partial Transcript: So, CORE is a national organization?

Segment Synopsis: K. and L. Jones mention the dedication of Abby Marlatt who was very active in CORE. Most of the segment is K. Jones reading a newspaper article on the downtown boycott. They also mention the impact of the boycott on downtown businesses, especially Parcell.

Keywords: Abby Marlatt; Biracial organizations; Black business; Boycotts; CORE (Congress of Racial Equality); Chamber of Commerce; Community relations; Downtown businesses; Human Rights Commission resolution; Inequality in employment; James Farmer; Joe Graves; Lexington Committee on Human Relations; Lexington Committee on Religion and Race; Louisville Times; Negro

Subjects: African Americans--Civil rights--Kentucky; Civil rights--Kentucky; Discrimination in employment; Kentucky Commission on Human Rights

00:42:43 - The death of Reggie O'Rourke / living conditions for black University of Kentucky students

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Partial Transcript: There, there was a tragic incident that took place in Lexington during this time, a young man was killed.

Segment Synopsis: K. and L. discuss the situation surrounding the death of a young black teenager in 1961 named Reggie O'Rourke. Mrs. Jones talks about the lack of places for black University of Kentucky students to go, due to segregated businesses. Mrs. Jones also talks about a letter written by General O'Rourke to UK's campus newspaper.

Keywords: Black students at UK; CORE (Congress of Racial Equality); Car accident; Henry O'Rourke; James O'Rourke; Leestown Rd. (Lexington, Ky.); Letter to newspaper; Lexington restaurants; Living conditions; Pasquale's (Lexington, Ky.); Segregation; Segregation of restaurants; UK

Subjects: African American families; African Americans--Kentucky--Lexington--Social conditions; University of Kentucky.

00:50:09 - Impact of foot soldiers in the movement

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Partial Transcript: Was there anything that uh, Reverend Jones, you or your wife would like to add that I haven't asked you?

Segment Synopsis: L. Jones shares his feelings on the work that he did with CORE and the role of the foot soldiers in the civil rights movement in Lexington. K. Jones talks about L. Jones brother's involvement in the civil rights movement in Brooklyn, New York.

Keywords: Brooklyn (Ny.); Desegregation; Foot soldiers; Impact of demonstrations; Participation in the movement; Ripple effect; Unknown soldiers

Subjects: African Americans--Civil rights--Kentucky; Civil rights movements--United States

00:55:28 - Black community relations

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Partial Transcript: I guess the thing that bothered me most during that period...

Segment Synopsis: K. Jones talks about the part of the black community that did not support the efforts of CORE in Lexington.

Keywords: Black community; Black community unity; Community relations; Julia Lewis; Negative community attitudes; Peggy Greenfield; Student involvement

Subjects: African Americans--Civil rights--Kentucky

00:59:10 - Different role in the movement / preserving black identity

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Partial Transcript: Every now and then, uh, the people who are now in those organizations seem to feel that...

Segment Synopsis: K. and L. Jones discuss how their roles in CORE and the movement have changed as they have gotten older. They go on to talk about the refocusing of the movement and a need to remember black history.

Keywords: Appreciating freedom; Black identification; Black power; Black pride; Change in the fight; Continued involvement; Freedom; Melting pot; New issues for blacks; Political commitment; Political participation

Subjects: Civil rights movements--United States