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00:00:01 - Introducing Jim Wayne Miller

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Partial Transcript: [Music] Jim Wayne Miller, Elizabeth Hardwick, Charles Rowell...

Segment Synopsis: Interviewer David Farrell introduces himself and the subject of the interview, Jim Wayne Miller, a poet and scholar of wide-reaching interests.

Keywords: Appalachia; Kentucky writers; Literature

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky.; Appalachia; Appalachian Region; Kentucky--In literature

00:01:27 - Miller's many jobs and how they all fit together

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Partial Transcript: Jim, one thing that's interested me as I've been thinking about your work and your life, have been the, the several roles you've played.

Segment Synopsis: Miller discusses how he views his various involvements as a German professor, a poet, and a scholar of Appalachia, and how they all tie together.

Keywords: Appalachia; German; Germany; History; Kentucky writers; Literature

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky.; Appalachia; Appalachian Region; Appalachian Region--History.; German literature.; Germany.; Kentucky--In literature.

00:02:58 - Parallels between twentieth century Appalachian and nineteenth century German literature / the solidarity of dialect

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Partial Transcript: Well, I guess I have a couple questions.

Segment Synopsis: Miller discusses an aforementioned parallel in detail: how his study of linguistics through German led to his study of dialects, and from there to Appalachia and the unique dialect there. This leads into Miller talking about the solidarity a dialect brings.

Keywords: Appalachia; German; German literature; Germany; Kentucky writers; Linguistics

Subjects: Appalachia; Appalachian Region; Appalachian Region--Social conditions; Appalachian Region--Social life and customs; Dialects; German literature.; Germany.; Linguistics.

00:07:11 - The rediscovery of folklore in the creation of a united Germany and a united Appalachia

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Partial Transcript: Did the, um--I'm trying to think back, I'd say nineteenth century German, uh, folklore movement, uh, I'm thinking of the Brothers Grimm and some others, did that have, have any parallel in your mind with what was going on in Appalachia?

Segment Synopsis: Miller compares the potential role of the revival of German folklore in the creation of a united German state to the realization of Appalachia as a distinct region within the country.

Keywords: Appalachia; Bismarck; German; German folklore; German literature; Germany; Kentucky writers; Literature; Otto von Bismarck; The Brothers Grimm

Subjects: Appalachia; Appalachian Region; Appalachian Region--History.; Appalachian Region--Social conditions; Appalachian Region--Social life and customs; Bismarck, Otto, Fürst von, 1815-1898.; German literature.; Germany.

00:10:28 - The "creation" of Appalachia

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Partial Transcript: Uh, the Appalachian people are, and have throughout their history, been very loyal to the Union, to the United States, to America.

Segment Synopsis: Miller discusses the idea of the creation of America on the Pennsylvania frontier, long before the American Revolution itself. As a result, he says, Appalachia was loyal to the Union during the Civil War, a surprising source of support that led to the creation of Appalachia as a unit within the country, both among themselves and to the people outside. Lincoln Memorial University in East Tennessee is the concrete evidence of the Union's short-lived Reconstruction-era support to the region. This also would have led to the creation of the trope of the old mountain "crone" swearing vengeance.

Keywords: American Civil War; Appalachia; Civil War; Kentucky writers

Subjects: Appalachia; Appalachian Region; Appalachian Region--History.; Appalachian Region--Social conditions; Appalachian Region--Social life and customs; United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865.

00:17:36 - Miller's own poetry and the influence of Appalachia

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Partial Transcript: How about some of your own work?

Segment Synopsis: Miller discusses how people described his poetry as evocative of Appalachia, something he didn't realize while writing. From there he talks about his book "The Mountains Have Come Closer," involving the "Hillbilly Migration" out of the hills and into Ohio.

Keywords: Appalachia; Kentucky writers

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky.; Kentucky--In literature.

00:21:42 - The dual role of Appalachian stereotypes and modern life

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Partial Transcript: And of course, this is, um, uh--people report to me that they feel a pressure.

Segment Synopsis: Based on the poem read in the previous segment, Miller and the interviewer discuss stereotypes of Appalachia. They also discuss the debate over what extent to modernize the region, of helping the people versus preserving culture.

Keywords: Appalachia; Appalachian stereotypes; Kentucky writers; Stereotypes

Subjects: Appalachia; Appalachian Region; Appalachian Region--Social conditions; Appalachian Region--Social life and customs; Stereotypes (Social psychology)

00:25:20 - On being an Appalachian poet / outsiders writing on the region

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Partial Transcript: Can you say something about your role as a poet in Appalachia?

Segment Synopsis: Miller discusses his role as a distinctly Appalachian poet and what it means to be a poet in general. He also approves of "outsiders" writing about Appalachia, because that brings them into the national consciousness, and to one day allow themselves to react themselves and tell their own story.

Keywords: Appalachia; Kentucky writers; Literature; Poetry

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky.; Appalachia; Appalachian Region; Kentucky--In literature.