Transcript
Toggle Index/Transcript View Switch.
Index
Search this Index
X
00:00:00 - Job description at Pikeville Methodist Hospital

Play segment

Partial Transcript: Vicie, say your name.

Segment Synopsis: Gibson worked in the dietary department as a cook during the morning shift. She would open up at four in the morning. She would get the stuff ready for the dining room and help the girls get ready for the day. She would then help get ready for lunch and dinner. They all signed the cards for the strikes and the union. She started working at the old hospital on the hill in 1962 and worked there for two and a half years. It was a hard time, so they signed the union cards. One day, Gibson received a call to not go into work. Instead, she went to go stand on the picket line. She also went to work at a nursing home, where she looked after people when she was not on the picket line. She eventually moved to Virginia for a little while because her son lived there.

Keywords: Chefs; Cooks; Dietary; Food; Hospitals; Nursing homes; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Sons; Virginia

Subjects: Cafeterias; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Rural health services; Salaries; Women political activists

00:06:07 - Cooking in the hospital

Play segment

Partial Transcript: So you were a cook and you'd go in early and you prepared food for the shift that was coming into work...

Segment Synopsis: Gibson cooked for people in the hospital and in the church and school. Sometimes the public ate the food too. It was a hard job because they were so busy all the time; they sometimes even went into the refrigerator to get a breath of cool air because it would get so stuffy. She then moved to a bigger hospital. After the cooking, they should have had someone to clean the dishes but the cooks were left to do this, as well as many other chores around the kitchen like cleaning the tables. They simply did not have enough people for these jobs. They complained to the higher up authorities, but they would not address their concerns. The conditions in the new kitchen were not any better.

Keywords: Authorities; Authority figures; Busy; Cafeterias; Churches; Complaints; Cooks; Dinners; Dishes; Employees; Employers; Employment; Food; Hospitals; Hungry; Kitchen work; Lunches; Meals; New kitchens; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Public; Refrigerators; Schools; Short supply; Short-staffed; Workers; Working conditions

Subjects: Appalachian Region--Economic conditions; Cafeteria benefit plans; Cafeteria benefit plans--Law and legislation; Cafeterias; Ethics.; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Pikeville (Ky.); Rural health services

00:10:01 - Poor working conditions

Play segment

Partial Transcript: Ms. Vickers was your supervisor then?

Segment Synopsis: Gibson recalls that her first supervisor was Anna Havlin. The supervisors were contacted to help, but they did not help the cooks in the kitchen. The biggest problem was that the stoves and the rest of the kitchen caused the kitchen to heat up too much, but there were no fans or air conditioning to help with this, even in the new kitchen. On top of that, the cooks had to clean their own dishes after they had already prepared food for the entire hospital and more. Additionally, they served the food. Not only did they have to make food for all the patients in the hospital, they also had to serve food for the rest of the people in the hospital in the cafeteria. It was already a hassle to create all the food that they were supposed to make for the menu, but they barely just finished preparing the food in time to serve it to the people.

Keywords: Air conditioning; Cafeterias; Cooking; Cooks; Customers; Desserts; Dishes; Food; Heat; Help; Hospitals; Kitchens; Menus; Patients; Pies; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Problems; Serving; Supervisors; Time

Subjects: Appalachian Region--Economic conditions; Cafeteria benefit plans; Cafeteria benefit plans--Law and legislation; Cafeterias; Ethics.; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Pikeville (Ky.); Rural health services

00:12:04 - Problems with being a cook at the hospital

Play segment

Partial Transcript: What did you think would happen for your job itself if you got the union in?

Segment Synopsis: Gibson just wanted to be the morning cook and put the food on the line. She believed that there should be someone else for washing the dishes. She also talks about some of the food that she prepared, such as chicken. Sometimes Gibson has also mopped the floors as well, even though that was not part of her job to do so. Gibson was doing most of the cooking herself, and she and the other cooks would eat lunch together. They were feeding at least 500 people. Gibson worked full time, sometimes working 12-14 hours a day if the evening shift cook did not come in.

Keywords: Cafeterias; Chicken; Cleaning; Cooks; Dietary; Dinners; Dishes; Evening shifts; Feeding; Food; Full-time; Kitchens; Lunches; Mopping; Morning shifts; Mornings; Part-time; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Shifts; Washing

Subjects: Appalachian Region--Economic conditions; Cafeteria benefit plans; Cafeteria benefit plans--Law and legislation; Cafeterias; Ethics.; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Medical Care--Kentucky; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Pikeville (Ky.); Rural health services

00:15:46 - Reasons for leaving Pikeville Methodist Hospital

Play segment

Partial Transcript: Why'd you apply for a job over at Pikeville Metho--Methodist the first time?

Segment Synopsis: Gibson quit her job at Pikeville Methodist because her neighbor Juanita went to the new hospital and Gibson went with her. The whole time she worked at the hospital, she only occupied the job as a cook. She had two main friends at the new hospital.

Keywords: Cooks; Hospitals; Leaving; Occupations; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Quitting

Subjects: Cafeterias; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Kentucky--Rural conditions.; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Pikeville (Ky.); Rural health services; Rural health--Kentucky

00:20:22 - Anticipating a strike

Play segment

Partial Transcript: You said that over at the other hospital you really knew you were gonna strike, you just didn't know when?

Segment Synopsis: Gibson states that even at the new hospital, everyone anticipated a strike. Almost everyone signed the union cards, including some of the nurses. However, the nurses did not join them on the strike because they were too scared that they would lose their job. Gibson and the other cooks could not talk much about the strike during work just in case someone may overhear. They were also aware that many would not strike because they were scared to lose their jobs and they did not want to pay the union strike dues.

Keywords: Expectations; Finances; Financial; Hospitals; Money; Nurses; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Signing; Strikers; Union cards; Union dues

Subjects: Appalachian Region--Economic conditions; Cafeteria benefit plans; Cafeteria benefit plans--Law and legislation; Cafeterias; Ethics.; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Kentucky--Rural conditions.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Rural health--Kentucky; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Women political activists

00:24:48 - Feelings surrounding the strike

Play segment

Partial Transcript: Who do you think were some of the key people--were you one of the key people who were trying to organize?

Segment Synopsis: Gibson mentions some people who were the key people of the strike in terms of managing the strike. She did not go in the morning of the strike because someone called her and instead of going to work, she joined the picket line. She said initially she did not care too much about going into work because she was not getting much money to begin with. Her family was mostly supportive of Gibson being on the strike. Some people were opposed to the strike and they would tell the strikers to go home.

Keywords: Denial; Disapproval; Economy; Jobs; Managers; Managing; Money; Opposition; Organizers; Organizing; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Problems; Protests; Wages

Subjects: Appalachian Region--Economic conditions; Cafeterias; Communications Workers of America; Ethics.; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Kentucky--Rural conditions.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Rural health--Kentucky; Salaries; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Women political activists

00:30:00 - Workers crossing the picket line

Play segment

Partial Transcript: When you think back to those days on the picket line during the strike, what do you remember the most about it now?

Segment Synopsis: The picket line was especially hard during the summer and the winter due to the extreme temperatures in both cases. Whenever someone told Gibson to go home, she said she would when the picket line was down. Some people immediately crossed the picket line as soon as they got off their job. They would then be taken out of the picket line. For example, a girl who was initially on the picket line went back to her job because her aunt told her to. Plus, she caused a lot of trouble on the picket line with fights.

Keywords: Cold; Determination; Difficult; Giving up; Hard times; Heat; Jobs; Perseverance; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Scabs; Seasons; Strikebreakers; Summers; Tough times; Winters

Subjects: Appalachian Region- Economic conditions; Cafeterias; Ethics.; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Kentucky--Rural conditions.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical Care--Kentucky; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Rural health--Kentucky; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Women political activists

00:38:09 - Passing time during the strike

Play segment

Partial Transcript: We just had a good time.

Segment Synopsis: Gibson talks about the different things that they did during the strike to pass the time. For instance, she recalls that during the Christmas season they would put up Christmas trees and during the summer they would ask others to go get them milkshakes. She says that they all had a good time together. They would celebrate each holiday with each other. Gibson also recalls that she made a quilt and she would hang it outside during the picket line. One of her friends also made a quilt. The bigger quilt consisted of all of the strikers' names who did not quit the picket line.

Keywords: Embroidery; Friends; Names; Outside; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Quilting; Quilts; Strikers

Subjects: Appalachian Region--Economic conditions; Cafeterias; Ethics.; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Kentucky--Rural conditions.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Rural health--Kentucky; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Traditional medicine; Women political activists

00:42:02 - Trip to Louisville for the strike

Play segment

Partial Transcript: Well did you like going into the union hall and being--

Segment Synopsis: Gibson liked going to the union meetings to make sure she knew what she was doing. They took a trip to Louisville one point, but they stayed in a miserable place while they were there. Gibson was personally scared about the place that they stayed in. The strikers claimed that they would not go home until the bishop decided to talk to them. They stayed for a total of 4 days in Louisville. They had a lot of support from the miners.

Keywords: Bishops; Churches; Efforts; Frightened; Group; Help; Louisville (Ky.); Miserable; Perseverance; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Purpose; Roberts; Scared; Strength; Support; Teams; Travel; Trips; Uncomfortable

Subjects: Appalachian Region--Economic conditions; Cafeterias; Coal mines and mining; Ethics.; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Kentucky--Rural conditions.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Rural health--Kentucky; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Women political activists

00:48:14 - Other trips for the strike / Rallies for the union

Play segment

Partial Transcript: One of the things I was--I'm asking everybody is to try think through all the things that you did during the strike, and you've been doing some of that.

Segment Synopsis: Besides Louisville, they also went to John's Creek. They would put signs on the cars. Gibson and her friend Juanita went to the mines to talk to them about the strike. They asked them to support the strikers from the Methodist Hospital and told them to not use the hospital (all family members who needed the hospital were told to go to a different hospital). They also went to other places where they supported and displayed their support of the strikers. During the union meetings, they all divided up who would go to which mine. People from all over the place would come for the rallies and there would be music, food, and big dinners for these people.

Keywords: Confidence; Friends; Help; Hospitals; John's Creek (Ky.); Juanita; Miners; Mines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Recruitment; Support; Travel; Trips

Subjects: Appalachian Region--Economic conditions; Cafeterias; Coal mines and mining; Coal mines and mining--Appalachian Region; Ethics.; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Kentucky--Rural conditions.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Rural health--Kentucky; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Women political activists

00:55:41 - Scabs sneaking into the hospital

Play segment

Partial Transcript: What about when the frike--when the strike first started, how did they get the scabs in there?

Segment Synopsis: It was about a week after the strike started before the hospital got scabs and volunteers in to work. Gibson talks about how a man named Justice used an ambulance to secretly transport scabs in. She talks about continuing to boycott Justice's funeral parlor to this day, despite friends having funerals there. She is also still boycotting the hospital.

Keywords: Against; Ambulance; Betrayal; Funeral homes; Funerals; Justice; Mad; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Scabs; Shacks; Strikebreakers; Support; Upset

Subjects: Appalachian Region--Economic conditions; Cafeterias; Ethics.; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Kentucky--Rural conditions.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Rural health--Kentucky; Strikes and lockouts; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Women political activists

01:00:19 - Picket strategy and boycotting other businesses

Play segment

Partial Transcript: When you went to the strike meetings, did you all talk about strike strategy and what to do?

Segment Synopsis: Usually, Lonnie Daniels would tell the strikers what to do but the union also listened to the strikers' suggestions. Gibson talks about attempting to garner support from the Methodist church, Bell Telephone, and other companies. She talks about boycotting businesses who were supporting the hospital, including Piggly Wiggly. She talks about strike activities like standing on the picket line and attending trials for some of the strikers.

Keywords: Appalachian Regional Hospital (ARH); Bell Telephone; Boycotting; Boycotts; Bruce Walters; Businesses; Communications Workers of America (CWA); Courthouses; Decisions; Duty; Effectiveness; Friends; Headquarters; Help; Husbands; Injunctions; Lonnie Daniels; Marches; Membership; Methodist churches; Methodists; Miners; Piggly Wiggly; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Planning; Strategies; Strikers; Support; Trials; Union meetings; Union officers; Union offices; Union officials

Subjects: Cafeterias; Communications Workers of America; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Women political activists

01:10:25 - Trouble getting her backpay from the strike

Play segment

Partial Transcript: Well, Vicie, were there people who dropped off their involvement with the strike?

Segment Synopsis: Gibson talks about the trouble she and other strikers have had in getting the back pay they were owed. She talks about not wanting to give up hope in the picket line.

Keywords: Attitudes; Backpay; Elections; Feelings; Giving up; Hopes; Jobs; Loss; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Quitting; Trouble; Voting; Waiting; Winning

Subjects: Cafeterias; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Women political activists

01:15:10 - Reminiscing about her time on the picket line

Play segment

Partial Transcript: I can't remember all this stuff, can you?

Segment Synopsis: Gibson says she misses the picket line because she got to work with all of her friends and they were all able to grow closer through their work at the picket line. She also misses the intensity of working at the hospital, even though she was happy to quit her job to be on the picket line. She explains that the work was really hard at the hospital. The hospital never had enough help, whether it was on the floor or in the kitchen. She talks more about the things she enjoyed and did not enjoy about the picket line.

Keywords: Advice; Air conditioning; Arrests; Easter; Eloise Pyle; Enjoyment; Expectations; Friends; Hard work; Heat; Help; Hospitals; Length; Meeting people; Memories; Methodist churches; Missing; Name calling; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Regrets; Right; Staff; Support; Talking; Trouble; Washtubs; Working conditions

Subjects: Cafeterias; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Women political activists

01:23:57 - Family's views on unions

Play segment

Partial Transcript: Was this the first strike you'd ever been in?

Segment Synopsis: Gibson states that this was the first picket line she participated in and she never crossed the hospital picket line, or any other picket line. Her family was mostly for the union because her father and her brother were miners in Pike County. Gibson's sisters said the picket line caused too much trouble but Gibson told them that she would be there no matter what.

Keywords: Airlines; Ashamed; Attitudes; Beliefs; Big Show Mine; Brothers; Crossing picket lines; Family; Fathers; Flying; Housewives; Mothers; Murders; Pauley Mine; Payment; Pensions; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Pro-union; Rallies; Sisters; Sons; Trouble; Wheelwright Mine

Subjects: Cafeterias; Coal miners; Coal mines and mining--Kentucky; Families.; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Salaries; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Women political activists

01:30:12 - People crossing the picket line

Play segment

Partial Transcript: Vicie, have you ever been involved in any other kind of organizing?

Segment Synopsis: Gibson got very close with the people that she was on strike with because she talked to them a lot. She still keeps up with many of her picket line friends. Gibson recalls that she tried to get many people to not quit the strike, including some of her friends. They would sometimes cross the picket line and she did not appreciate that. Gibson tried to make sure that she would not cause trouble on the picket line, but it would make her mad when people would cross the picket line.

Keywords: Closeness; Crossing picket lines; Mad; Meetings; Organizing; Personal; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Pressure; Relationships; Scabs; Strikebreakers; Strikers; Talking; Trouble; UMWA members; United Mine Workers of America (UMWA)

Subjects: Cafeterias; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Women political activists

01:36:24 - Household during the strike

Play segment

Partial Transcript: Well Vicie, I'm trying to get from everybody an idea of what their households were like and who was living together and what it was like to try to run your house at the time of the strike and stuff, so I've got a series of questions on that...

Segment Synopsis: Gibson states that she and her husband lived together during the time of the strike. She was 52 years old and her husband Andrew was 62. At the time of the strike, her husband was retired and had retirement benefits from the company. Gibson had some benefits from the union, such as the insurance and grocery orders. She talks about who did various chores in the household during the strike. She talks about how they entertained themselves and how the strike brought her family closer together.

Keywords: Air conditioning; Bills; Children; Chores; Closeness; Communications Workers of America (CWA); Cooking; Effects; Entertainment; Family; Finances; Food; Fun; Gardens; Heart attacks; Help; Households; Housework; Husbands; Impact; Learning; Leaving; Money; Moving; Pensions; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Recreation; Retired; Retirement; Sewing; Shopping; Travel; Visiting; Wages; Washing; Working conditions

Subjects: Cafeterias; Communications Workers of America; Families.; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Labor unions--Strike benefits; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Salaries; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Women political activists

01:43:39 - Biographical information

Play segment

Partial Transcript: I want to ask you some other questions now, Vicie. Where were you born?

Segment Synopsis: Gibson states that she was born in Island Creek in Pike County in 1920. Her parents were also from Island Creek. Gibson went to school at Island Creek School until the 8th grade. She quit school to help out on the farm and to work other jobs. She talks about meeting and marrying her husband Andrew. She talks about her children and grandchildren and when they were born. She talks about all of the places she has worked during her life.

Keywords: Andrew Gibson; Birthplace; Childrearing; Children; Coal miners; Courting; Dating; Daughters; Dropping out; Fathers; Favorite places; Fields; Gardens; Gas companies; Grandchildren; High schools; Homeplace; Hospitals; Island Creek (Ky.); Jobs; Juanita; Married; Michigan; Mining; Mothers; Moving; Nursing homes; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Pregnant; Restaurants; Retirement; Schools; Virginia; Working

Subjects: Cafeterias; Childhood; Family farms; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Traditional farming; Traditional medicine; Women political activists

01:58:00 - Reminiscing about her fellow strikers

Play segment

Partial Transcript: Well, let's roll back to a little bit more on the strike.

Segment Synopsis: Gibson talks about her hopes for the outcome of the strike when it began. Gibson and some of her friends still talk about the strike, reflect on their time together, and how the times were different back then. Gibson also recalls her friends who were on the picket line with her. She talks about how her life has been affected by the strike.

Keywords: Andrew Gibson; Anna Mae Fields; Better; Children; Effects; Expectations; Family; Fathers; Finances; Food; Future; Harder; Hopes; Husbands; Jobs; Juanita; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Shifts; Strikers; Support; Treatment; Union contracts; Working conditions; Worse

Subjects: Cafeterias; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Salaries; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Women political activists

02:04:52 - Conditions at the hospital for patients and employees

Play segment

Partial Transcript: Well, Vicie if you get, uh, ideas of stories you want to add to this, you make notes on them and I'll get back up here and we'll put them on.

Segment Synopsis: Gibson talks about the workers being told to reuse sugar packets, jelly, and other things that had been on patients' trays. She talks about how they were told to refreeze leftover food. She talks about the conditions for the workers, including low pay and no retirement funds.

Keywords: Charity hospitals; Cooking; Employees; Feeding; Food; Jelly; Leftovers; Milk; Patient care; Payment; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Prices; Retirement; Reuse; Reusing; Serving; Sugar packets; Trays; Unused; Wages; Working conditions

Subjects: Cafeterias; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Occupations.; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Salaries; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Women political activists

02:10:18 - People crossing picket lines and other opposition to the strike

Play segment

Partial Transcript: You thought, uh, going around to the miners and, um, talking to people about not crossing the picket line...

Segment Synopsis: Gibson talks about people who would cross the picket line, including church members and others who would go to the cafeteria for lunch. She talks about her interactions with hospital board members. She talks about whether the police bothered them on the picket lines, and discusses the limits on the number of picketers allowed on the picket line. She talks about the strikers being blamed for things like dynamite being planted in the hospital, which she says she believes was actually done by someone who opposed the strike.

Keywords: Blame; Board members; Cafeterias; Churches; Coal miners; Crossing picket lines; Curtis Wallace; Dan Jack Combs; Dynamite; Eating; Husbands; Lawyers; Lee D. Keene; Limits; Lola Wallace; Numbers; Opposition; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Police; Public; Regulations; Scabs; Shacks; Strikebreakers; Support; Tacks; Telephone calls; Trouble; Volunteering; Volunteers

Subjects: Cafeterias; Communications Workers of America; Food service employees; Hospital and community.; Hospital care--United States.; Labor unions; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical Care--Kentucky; Medical care--Kentucky; Medicine, Rural; Nursing.; Occupations.; Picketing; Picketing.; Pikeville (Ky.); Protest movements.; Rural health services; Salaries; Strikes and lockouts--Kentucky; Traditional medicine; Women political activists