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00:00:00 - Working as a nurse aide in the old hospital

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Partial Transcript: --uise, say your name.

Segment Synopsis: Huffman begins by giving details of her employment as a nurse's aide at the hospital. She was in charge of patient care, which included checking vital signs, emptying bed pans, changing bedsheets, etc. She trained under a registered nurse at a nursing home before applying for a job at the hospital. Huffman then names several of her supervisors in the old hospital. She was placed in the newer wing of the old hospital, taking care of the wealthier patients in private and semi-private rooms. She explains that the hospital was understaffed, and she would often have to work longer to wait for another shift to relieve her, even though the hospital administrators didn't want to pay her extra. She would turn in her overtime hours regardless and fought for extra pay several times.

Keywords: Cleaning; Day shifts; Dottie Carter; Faye Morris; Hospital wards; Hospitals; Irene Allen; Nursing homes; Overtime; Patient care; Paulie Justice; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Registered nurses (RNs); Supervisors; Temperature; Training; Treatments; Vital signs

Subjects: Bedpans; Blood pressure; Body temperature; Nurses' aides; Occupations; Patient monitoring; Pikeville (Ky.); Salaries; Women nurses

00:08:10 - Moving to the new hospital / Working in Pikeville Methodist Hospital

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Partial Transcript: So you'd been working up there then for a while before the new one opened, right?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman describes moving their patients from the old to the new hospital. In the old hospital, they were assigned 24 patients. In the new hospital, they were assigned 40 patients, with the same 3 nurses expected to take care of all 40 patients. Huffman describes working on the sixth floor of the new hospital, which held some of the worst patients. The hospital was so understaffed that on several occasions, some patients wouldn't get water until after dinner. Huffman also describes an encounter with Mr. Elliot, chairman of the board, in which she showed him her paycheck and told him it wasn't enough to pay her grocery bill. Huffman stated that she enjoyed working in the old hospital and the new hospital would have been fine if the hospital administrators would have hired more help to care for the patients. The patients were paying money to be taken care of but they were not receiving the help they needed as there were not enough workers to properly care for all of the patients. Huffman says that this is why she walked out, because the hospital was working them to death with little to no breaks and there were not enough workers to care for the patients.

Keywords: Bills; Breaks; Hospital boards; Hospital staff; Hospitals; Mr. Elliot; Patient care; Patients; Paychecks; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Supervisors; United Methodist Hospital; Working conditions

Subjects: Hospital operations; Medical care; Nurses' aides; Occupations; Rural health services; Salaries; Strikes and lockouts; Traditional medicine

00:14:55 - Working conditions in the new hospital / Beginning of unionization

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Partial Transcript: Well, when did you start talking union, Louise?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman remembers talking about forming a union in the old hospital as they were understaffed. Once the patients were moved into the new hospital, the number of patients increased, worsening their working conditions. Huffman describes tensions with the nursing staff, as many of them would not help the nurses' aides. Huffman describes the process of moving into the new hospital and training new registered nurses. Huffman remembers signing her union card and encouraging others to sign as well. She thought that forming a union was the only way they would get better working conditions.

Keywords: Bedpans; Doctors; Hospital boards; Hospitals; Mr. Elliot; Nurses; Patient care; Patients; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Registered nurses (RNs); Supervisors; Trainings; Treatments; Union cards; United Methodist Hospital; Working conditions

Subjects: Education; Hospital operations; Labor unions--Organizing; Medical care; Nurses' aides; Occupations; Salaries; Strikes and lockouts

00:24:17 - First day of the strike at Pikeville Methodist Hospital

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Partial Transcript: What happened the day of the strike? Were you at work?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman remembers being off duty when the strike began. She saw the picket line when she arrived for work the next day and went back home instead. She stood on the picket line that evening. Huffman describes the first picket line as having 200 people covering the road. Huffman describes her initial expectations of the strike; she was unsure of how long the strike would last but she had a good time while she was on picket duty. Huffman typically pulled night shift on the picket line and then worked at a radio station as a part time job.

Keywords: Cleaning; Filing records; Hospitals; Labor unions; Night shifts; Part-time jobs; Picket duties; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Roadways; Sewing; United Methodist Hospital; Working conditions

Subjects: Cooking; Music radio stations; Occupations; Picketing; Strikes and lockouts

00:28:23 - Standing on the picket line / Conflicts during picket duty

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Partial Transcript: So tell me what it was like on the picket line.

Segment Synopsis: Huffman describes passing the time during picket duty by cooking, sewing, walking, and talking. She describes one instance of scattering popcorn all over the road, which scared drivers into taking a different way. Huffman's father was very involved, and would come down and sit with her while she was on picket duty. He would also fill in for her on picket duty if she was working. Huffman's own cousin worked as a security guard during the strike and she recalls an instance where he came out to speak with Huffman's father while he was on the line with her. She recalled the numbers of strikers on the picket line dropping to three or four, as the hospital filed a restraining order. Huffman recalls playing a ball game while on picket duty. The police arrived and arrested Mary Ann James for disturbing the peace, Huffman did not agree with this and thought that if they were going to arrest Mary Ann, they should arrest everyone there. Huffman recounted one instance of being sprayed in the face with hairspray by one of the hospital workers. Huffman then shares a story of her and Minnie Lunsford getting attacked by the son of one of the hospital workers.

Keywords: Abraham Billiter; Cooking; Courthouses; Courts; Crocheting; Fines; Injunctions; Jails; Judges; Mary Ann James; Minnie Carol; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Restraining orders; Scabs; Sewing; Singing; Talking; United Mine Workers of America (UMWA); William Billiter

Subjects: Arrest (Police Methods); Breach of the peace; Communities; Families; Picketing; Pike County (Ky.); Security guards; Strikebreakers; Strikes and lockouts; Strikes and lockouts--Law and legislation; Trials (Assault and battery); United Mine Workers of America

00:49:00 - Picketing Bruce Walters Ford Sales and the Piggly Wiggly

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Partial Transcript: What else did you all do around town?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman describes other duties that she had while on strike. She spent most of her time standing on the picket line at Bruce Walters Ford Sales. He was using the cars to transport workers in and out of the Pikeville Methodist Hospital so they could avoid the picket line. Huffman and several others kept up the picket line for about three or four weeks until the court ordered them to take it down. Huffman recalled the owners driving close to the picketers to try and scare them into leaving. Mary Ann James recounted one incident of being threatened with a shot gun while picketing in front of the Piggly Wiggly.

Keywords: Bruce Walters Ford Sales; Car sales; Courthouses; Eloise Pyle Bevins; Lee D. Keene; Mary Ann James; Picket lines; Piggly Wiggly; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Robert Walters; Scabs; Shotguns; United Methodist Hospital

Subjects: Communities; Picketing; Pike County (Ky.); Strikebreakers; Strikes and lockouts--Law and legislation; Women political activists

01:00:22 - Other strike activities

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Partial Transcript: What's the--what was the time you were talking about, Mary Ann, uh, when you wore wigs and they couldn't identify you?

Segment Synopsis: Mary Ann James and Louise Huffman share several experiences while on strike from Pikeville Methodist Hospital. Mary Ann James shares one experience where they all wore disguises so no one would recognize them. Huffman then talks about the casket and wreath of flowers sent to the hospital. She also was part of an incident on the state highway where the coal miners beat on drums while she did a war dance. Huffman shares stories of hopping over guardrails to avoid cars. Mary Ann James was hit by a car once, injuring her shoulder.

Keywords: Caskets; Eloise Pyle Bevins; Hospitals; Labor unions; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Scabs; State highways; United Methodist Hospital

Subjects: Coal miners; Picketing; Pikeville (Ky.); Strikebreakers; Strikes and lockouts; Women political activists

01:08:29 - Attending a rally in Harlan, Kentucky

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Partial Transcript: You went on some trips, didn't you?

Segment Synopsis: When asked if she took any trips to protest, Huffman shares a story of traveling to Harlan. Huffman includes more details of attending a rally at a school in Harlan. They also went to a picket line at a hospital and sat with the strikers there. She went to the mine that was on strike there and met several mine workers from the Brookside mines.

Keywords: Ardena Wheeler; Brookside; Courthouses; Hazel Ratliff; Hospitals; Labor unions; Mines; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Rallies

Subjects: Coal Miners' Strike, Harlan County, Ky., 1973.; Coal miners--Labor unions; Demonstrations; Harlan (Ky.); Picketing; Strikes and lockouts

01:10:12 - Explaining photographs of strikes and protests

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Partial Transcript: What's going on here when this picture's taken?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman explains the contents of several old photographs. One shows them marching up towards the church. Huffman recalls going right up to the front door of the Pikeville Methodist Hospital. They were singing and praying for better working conditions in front of the hospital. A preacher that was with them was arrested. Mary Ann James was asked to stay on the picket line but Huffman was involved in the protest that day.

Keywords: Churches; Fathers; Hospitals; Labor unions; Minnie Carol; Peggy Robinette; Photographs; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Praying; Preachers; Protests; Singing; United Methodist Hospital; Working conditions

Subjects: Communities; Methodist church buildings; Picketing; Strikes and lockouts; Women political activists

01:12:20 - Reapplying to Pikeville Methodist Hospital after the strike ended

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Partial Transcript: Well, let me ask you about, um, so you took a part-time job and your dad was substituting for you, right?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman took a part-time job at the radio station during the strike, and was an active striker until they took the picket line down. Once the strike ended, she reapplied for her job at the Pikeville Methodist Hospital. She was never called by the hospital to reapply, as she missed the notice they had sent her. She reported the incident to the National Labor and Relations Board.

Keywords: Income; Job applications; Jobs; Labor unions; Minnie Carol; National Labor Relations Board (NLRB); Nursing; Physical examinations; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Union offices; United Methodist Hospital; Working; Working conditions

Subjects: Lexington (Ky.); Nurses' aides; Occupations; Picketing; United States. National Labor Relations Board

01:15:23 - Union activities / Roadblocks

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Partial Transcript: Well when you were doing stuff during the strike, who'd you usually do things with?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman describes picketing with several other women on the night shift, and explaining that her father would substitute for her when she had to work. Huffman spent the majority of her time on the picket line, but also made several trips to the union office. Huffman describes setting up roadblocks with other strikers and almost being run over.

Keywords: Della Ray; Friends; Labor unions; Minnie Carol; Night shifts; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Roadblocks; Union offices; Working conditions

Subjects: Communities; Picketing; Salaries; Strikes and lockouts; Women political activists

01:18:44 - Initial expectations for the strike at Pikeville Methodist Hospital

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Partial Transcript: Well, when you came out then, did you expect--did you think you were gonna win it?

Segment Synopsis: As they were signing labor union cards, Huffman thought they would need to strike in order to get a union and get better working conditions. When they first walked out on strike, Huffman believed they would win it. A major issue was the control the hospital board held over the state and the police department. Once the strike ended, Huffman held onto hope that they would win in the courts. Huffman supported that the strikers remained in contact with each other even when the picket line was taken down.

Keywords: Board directors; Communications; Courts; Hospital administrations; Hospital boards; Labor unions; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Police departments; Scabs; Union cards; Working conditions

Subjects: Communities; Labor unions--Organizing; Picketing; Strikebreakers; Strikes and lockouts; Women political activists

01:21:22 - Labor union meetings

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Partial Transcript: Did you meet with the union and labor board people in those years in between the picket line and--

Segment Synopsis: Huffman describes meeting with the union and going to the union hall. The labor union helped her get all of her backpay from the Pikeville Methodist Hospital. Because she was unable to complete a physical examination, she was not invited to reapply to work in the hospital. Though the labor union offered to help her get her job back, Huffman knew the labor conditions were still poor. She feared she would be fired soon after being rehired if she returned to the hospital. Huffman says that if she was to return to the Pikeville Methodist Hospital, she would probably work to unionize to improve working conditions and patient care. Huffman then describes attending labor union meetings where they discussed picket duty and strike strategies.

Keywords: Backpay; Communications Workers of America (CWA); Hospital administrations; Hospital boards; Job applications; John Adams; Labor unions; Lonnie Daniels; National Labor and Relations Board (NLRB); Patient care; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Strike strategies; Union halls; Union meetings; Union members; United Methodist Hospital; Working conditions

Subjects: Communications Workers of America; Frankfort (Ky.); Harlan (Ky.); Labor unions--Organizing; National Labor and Relations Board; Picketing; Salaries; Strike and lockouts

01:26:53 - Support from United Mine Workers of America / Support from licensed practical nurses

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Partial Transcript: What did you think about the UMW support that you got?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman describes the support from the United Mine Workers of America union as good, but it could have been better. She states that union members should never cross a picket line, and told them that they should be ashamed. Huffman thinks the reason their strike at Pikeville Methodist Hospital had so many people cross the picket line is because they thought there was no where else to go for medical care. Huffman says the licensed practical nurses were supposed to go out on strike with them, but the Pikeville Methodist Hospital threatened to take their licenses. Huffman describes the current program in the hospital, known as a house union.

Keywords: House unions; In-service; Job security; Labor unions; Licensed practical nurses (LPNs); Medical licenses; Patients; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Railroad unions; Scabs; Union members; United Mine Workers of America (UMWA); Working conditions

Subjects: Picketing; Practical nurses; Strikebreakers; Strikes and lockouts; United Mine Workers of America

01:31:47 - Support from family / Union history

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Partial Transcript: Well as you said, your father was there and Eloise was there a lot. Um, was your family pretty supportive then of you being on strike?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman describes the support she received from her family. Her father, brothers, and daughter all joined her on the picket line. While this was Huffman's first strike, her father was involved in several as a coal miner in United Mine Workers of America. Her brother, James Billiter works with the UMWA and her other brother Paul Billiter works with the Southern Labor Union. Her father was involved in several strikes in Harlan County. He helped others to unionize. Huffman's father thought the UMWA should have given more support to the strike on Pikeville Methodist Hospital.

Keywords: Bloody Harlan; Brothers; Carl Billiter; Gordon's Potato Chips; Harlan County War; James Billiter; Labor unions; Mine workers; Paul Billiter; Picket lines; Piggly Wiggly; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Robert Wallace; Southern Labor Union (SLU); United Methodist Hospital; United Mine Workers of America (UMWA); Working conditions

Subjects: Coal miners--Labor unions--Organizing; Families; Family histories; Harlan (Ky.); Picketing; Pike County (Ky.); Strikes and lockouts; United Mine Workers of America; Women political activists

01:37:33 - Managing a household during the strike

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Partial Transcript: When you--when the strike was going on, I'm trying to get an idea of what everybody's households were like and how they managed to get by. Where were you living?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman describes living with her parents and two children during the strike. Her children were 16 and 10, and they would often either go with her or take her place when she had to work. Her father worked in a steel factory's union and retired while the strike was going on. He sent his pay home to support their family. Both of her kids stayed in school, and they received help from the Communications Workers of America union. CWA paid a large portion of her bills and she worked part-time to take care of extra expenses. Huffman says that her family has always been close, and they worked together as a team during the strike.

Keywords: Bills; Chores; Communications Workers of America (CWA); Gardens; Income; Labor unions; Night shifts; Part-time jobs; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Radio stations; Steel factories

Subjects: Children; Education; Families; Labor unions--Strike benefits; Occupations; Picketing; Salaries

01:41:52 - Biography / Job history

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Partial Transcript: I'm also asking everybody a little biography stuff, so we sort of know who you are. When were you born and where?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman shares details of her birth and childhood. She was born and raised in Pike County, Kentucky and went to school in Pikeville. She went to school through the eighth grade, and then after the strike, took a test to get her GED (General Education Development). She took another test to be admitted to the Kentucky Business College and took a business course at night. Her mother's family was from Virginia and her father was from Pike County. Huffman got married in 1954 and they moved to live together for a few months before moving back to live with her parents. They later moved across the hill from her parents and stayed there for two years together. Huffman's husband was killed while going to Mayo State Vocational School in Paintsville, Kentucky. When he was killed, Huffman moved back in with her parents. By 1964, she had two children and was living with her parents. To support her children, she worked two jobs, cleaning the radio station and the funeral parlor in addition to cleaning Georgie Ward's home. Huffman moved out of state in 1967, and lived in Ohio for two years. It was in Ohio that Huffman began working in a nursing home. After two years, they returned to Pike County and Huffman got a job at the hospital.

Keywords: Boards of education; Colleges; General Education Developments; Georgie Ward; High school diplomas; Kentucky Business College; Mayo State Vocational School; Nursing; Nursing homes; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Radio stations

Subjects: Childhood; Education; Families; Family histories; Fremont (Ohio); GED tests; Midwives; Occupations; Paintsville (Ky.); Pike County (Ky.); Pikeville (Ky.); Sandusky County (Ohio)

01:54:32 - Feelings after the strike ended

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Partial Transcript: If you had that strike to do over, would you, uh, first of all, would you do it again?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman shares that she would strike again since the conditions were so bad. Huffman is unsure of what she could change to make the strike more effective. She said it was hard work and it was difficult to picket when the temperatures dropped below zero. Huffman shares that while it was hard work, they had a fun time doing it. When asked what she would have done differently, Huffman says she didn't know what else she could do. She just wished that other people would put their community first. Huffman also states that she was a better person after standing on the picket line during the strike on Pikeville Methodist Hospital.

Keywords: Hospital boards; Labor unions; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Scabs; United Methodist Hospital; Working conditions

Subjects: Children; Communities; Families; Picketing; Salaries; Strikebreakers; Strikes and lockouts; Women political activists

01:58:09 - Advice she would give her daughter on strike

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Partial Transcript: If Eloise was going into a strike, what kind of advice would you give her?

Segment Synopsis: If her daughter Eloise were to go on strike, Huffman would tell her to stick with it. Huffman states that Eloise would do the same thing she did and stick with it. She then goes into discussing her grandchildren. Huffman then discusses her initial expectations during the strike. She said she took it one day at a time, focusing on your goal. When asked about going back to college, Huffman said she would study nursing again.

Keywords: Advice; Colleges; Daughters; Eloise Huffman; Expectations; Goals; Nursing; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Plans

Subjects: Children; Education, Higher; Families; Grandchildren; Picketing; Strikes and lockouts; Women political activists

02:00:22 - Memories of Mary Ann James on the picket line

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Partial Transcript: Well, since I've got all you all together, what do you remember about Mary Ann when she was on the picket line?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman shares that she had a great time with Mary Ann James on the picket line. She recalled a ball game that they played together. They would stand on the picket line and watch people go in and out of the hospital. Huffman looked back fondly on their time spent on the picket line, recalling cooking and eating different types of food. She says that the time they spent on the picket line reminded her of a big camp ground.

Keywords: Advice; Ball games; Beans; Cooking; Fires; Hotdogs; Labor unions; Marshmallows; Mary Ann James; Memories; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Popcorn; Potatoes; Scabs; Working conditions

Subjects: Communities; Picketing; Strikebreakers; Strikes and lockouts; Women political activists

02:02:38 - Other stories from striking Pikeville Methodist Hospital

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Partial Transcript: You remember any other stories from over there you wanna tell?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman shares a story of picketing with a preacher from the Methodist Church. They walked right up to the front door of Pikeville Methodist Hospital. Huffman also shares stories of traveling to Harlan, Kentucky to sit with Appalachian Regional Healthcare strikers. The only thing she hated about that strike was that they were unable to get a union into their hospital.

Keywords: Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH); Fathers; Mary Ann James; Memories; Photo albums; Photographs; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Scabs

Subjects: Families; Harlan (Ky.); Picketing; Strikebreakers; Strikes and lockouts; Women political activists

02:05:31 - Other strikers returning to work at Pikeville Methodist Hospital after the strike

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Partial Transcript: Did you think almost everybody would go back in?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman shares that, after the strike, she expected more people to return to work at Pikeville Methodist Hospital. Because their strike was unsuccessful in bringing a union into the hospital, the working conditions in the Pikeville Methodist Hospital did not improve. Huffman says that she could not imagine returning to the same working conditions that made her walk out in the first place. Huffman then shares stories of taking Lee D. Keene to court for using vulgar words and hand signs at the strikers.

Keywords: Court houses; Dancing; Hollering; Hospital boards; Hospitals; Labor unions; Lee D. Keene; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Restraining orders; United Methodist Hospital; Working conditions

Subjects: Communities; Lexington (Ky).; Picketing; Strikes and lockouts; Women political activists

02:10:54 - Testimony about working conditions in Pikeville Methodist Hospital

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Partial Transcript: This was in the files at the council, that you all must have gotten together something about testimony.

Segment Synopsis: Huffman reads aloud a testimony that she put together. In her testimony, she outlines the working conditions that she experienced while working in Pikeville Methodist Hospital. She stated that supervisors made taking days off very difficult, that her pay was docked every time she was late, and if you didn't have a doctor's excuse you were not paid. Huffman often had to "float" from floor to floor and worked without breaks and sometimes lunch. When she was ordered to administer medicine, she refused as she is not licensed to give medicine to patients. She was reprimanded once for bathing a male patient, even though there were not enough male nurses to care for all of the male patients on the floor.

Keywords: Catheters; Doctors excuses; Emergency rooms; Enemas; Hospitals; Licenses; Needles; Patient care; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Qualifications; Retirement plans; Sick days; Supervisors; Testimonies; United Methodist Hospitals; Veins; Working conditions

Subjects: Injections, Intravenous; Male nurses; Medical care--Appalachian Region; Salaries; Traditional medicine

02:17:07 - Story of the wrong baby being sent home from Pikeville Methodist Hospital

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Partial Transcript: You remember Martha Hall?

Segment Synopsis: Mary Ann James recollects an incident in Pikeville Methodist Hospital where two babies were switched and sent to the wrong homes. Because the doctor in charge of OB (Obstetrics) was trying to date Martha, the blame was placed on Ethel, the supervisor. Even though Ethel was on break at the time, she was fired for Martha Hall's mistake. Huffman and James stated that mistakes like these happened often in the Pikeville Methodist Hospital.

Keywords: Babies; Breaks; Hospitals; John Hall; Lee D. Keene; Licensed practical nurses (LPNs); Martha Hall; Mary Ann James; Mothers; Obstetricians; Obstetrics (OB); Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Supervisors; United Methodist Hospital; Working conditions

Subjects: Children; Hospitals--Nurseries; Medical care--Appalachian Region; Nurses' Aides; Obstetricians; Practical nurses

02:21:38 - Nurses' aides required to give medicine in Pikeville Methodist Hospital

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Partial Transcript: Just things like that, you know they'd happen everyday.

Segment Synopsis: Mistakes like sending the wrong baby home from the nursery would happen everyday in Pikeville Methodist Hospital and much of the blame would be put on the nurses' aides. The nurses' aides were often ordered to administer medicine even when they were not licensed or qualified to give medicine. Huffman refused to administer medicine to patients; she said that the nurses' aides had enough work to do without doing the work of the other RNs and LPNs.

Keywords: Bedpans; Doctors; Hospitals; Job security; Licensed practical nurses (LPNs); Medical licenses; Medicine; Mistakes; Patient care; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Qualifications; Registered nurses (RNs); Responsibilities; Supervisors; United Methodist Hospital; Working conditions

Subjects: Hospital patients; Medical care--Appalachian Region; Nurses' Aides; Nursing; Occupations; Practical nurses

02:24:22 - Working at the radio station

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Partial Transcript: So how long can we keep you from the radio station?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman describes enjoying more freedom now that she works in the radio station, commenting that she had earned her time. Huffman shares that she is working the late shift tonight and will be working until midnight tonight. They discuss the 15 year reunion of the strike on Pikeville Methodist Hospital and how Huffman should dedicate a song to the strikers.

Keywords: Bosses; Freedoms; Georgie Ward; Labor unions; Night shifts; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Reunions; Strikers; United Methodist Hospitals; Working conditions

Subjects: Occupations; Radio programs; Radio stations; Strikes and lockouts; Women political activists

02:27:10 - Memories from the strike on Pikeville Methodist Hospital

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Partial Transcript: Does it seem like yesterday to you?

Segment Synopsis: Huffman looks back fondly on her time on the strike at Pikeville Methodist Hospital and says she remembers it like it was yesterday. The memories that stand out to her the most make her laugh. She recalls one instance of scattering popcorn all across the road and the hospital staff was too afraid to drive over it. Even the security guards were too afraid to walk through it. First she was scheduled on the day shift for picket duty and she spent most of her time picketing Bruce Walters Ford Sales. Later she was moved to the night shift, which is where she played a ball game with Mary Ann James. The police were called and they took James to the police station for disturbing the peace.

Keywords: Ball games; Bodyguards; Bruce Walters Ford Sales; Disturbing the peace; Hospitals; Joe Dotson; Johnny Robertson; Memories; Midnight shifts; Minnie Carol; Morning shifts; Night shifts; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Police; Popcorn; Scabs; Security guards; Shift changes; Strikers; United Methodist Hospital

Subjects: Picketing; Police vehicles; Strikebreakers; Strikes and lockouts; Women political activists

02:36:24 - Pranks while they were on strike at Pikeville Methodist Hospital

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Partial Transcript: You know, uh, I'm trying to think of who it was went in that one time.

Segment Synopsis: James recalls a cherry bomb going off in the toilet of the hospital. After it went off, a hospital security guard came out of the bathroom with his pants down. One of the other strikers snuck into the hospital and put a firecracker into the toilet in the bathroom. She describes the security guard returning to Lexington and stating that he would never get involved with a strike like that again. Huffman remembers dressing up as a witch on the picket line to scare the hospital workers. Huffman also recalls some of the dangers of standing on the picket lines, sharing stories of jumping over guardrails to avoid being hit by cars while on the picket line.

Keywords: Cherry bombs; Disguises; Firecrackers; Fuses; Guardrails; Hospitals; Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Pranks; Scabs; Security guards; United Methodist Hospital

Subjects: Lexington (Ky.); Picketing; Practical jokes; Strikebreakers; Strikes and lockouts; Women political activists

02:41:04 - Final thoughts on the strike on Pikeville Methodist Hospital

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Partial Transcript: Well we announced and asked people to, if there was emergencies or their people were sick to take them--there was other hospitals close by.

Segment Synopsis: Huffman shares that they asked the public not to cross their picket line during the strike and encouraged them to seek medical care at another hospital. Huffman also points out that the working conditions in Pikeville Methodist Hospital have not improved since before the strike. Huffman supports that she would do the strike all over again.

Keywords: Emergencies; Emergency rooms; Hospitals; Johnny Johnson; Licensed practical nurses (LPNs); Picket lines; Pikeville Methodist Hospital; Registered nurses (RNs); United Methodist Hospital; Working conditions

Subjects: Education; Medical care--Appalachian Region; Practical nurses; Strikebreakers; Strikes and lockouts; Traditional medicine; Women political activists