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00:00:00 - Kentucky Writers Oral History Project introduction

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Partial Transcript: This is an oral history interview with Wade Hall being conducted on September eighth, 1991, by Linda Beattie, for the Kentucky Writers Oral History Project.

Segment Synopsis: Interviewer Linda Beatty and interviewee Wade Hall are introduced.

Keywords: Alabama writers; Kentucky writers; Wade Hall

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Kentucky--In literature.

00:00:19 - Introduction to Wade Hall / early childhood

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Partial Transcript: Now what is your full name, please?

Segment Synopsis: Hall gives his full name and then talks about his family and early childhood in Alabama. His mother was intelligent and mostly self-educated, whereas his father was possibly illiterate, like a large part of his family--this being an "oral society" and literacy was not really necessary. He also mentions his siblings--four brothers, all younger than him.

Keywords: Alabama writers; Inverness (Ala.); Kentucky writers; Montgomery (Ala.); Union Springs (Ala.); Wade Hall

Subjects: American South.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature.

00:05:28 - Closeness with grandmother / difficult relationship with parents

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Partial Transcript: What about your grandparents?

Segment Synopsis: Hall discussed being raised largely by his grandmother and the--at the time--traumatic event of her remarrying and moving away a year before she died, forcing him to move in with his parents, neither of whom he properly got along with while he lived under their roof.

Keywords: Inverness (Ala.); Montgomery (Ala.); Opp (Ala.); Union Springs (Ala.)

Subjects: American South.; Childhood; Families.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature.

00:11:24 - Reasons and need to go to college

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Partial Transcript: But see, I left home at sixteen, to go to college.

Segment Synopsis: Hall talks about how he wound up going to college at age 16 and why he felt he needed to. His only professional role models were teachers and so he decided he would be a teacher.

Keywords: Education; Inverness (Ala.); Literature; Montgomery (Ala.); Union Springs (Ala.)

Subjects: Education, Higher; Education.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Higher education; Literature.; Young, Stark, 1881-1963

00:14:32 - Early education

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Partial Transcript: What was your early education like?

Segment Synopsis: Hall discusses his education at county public schools, his grade skipping, the levels of education his brothers achieved, and segregation in the school systems. A principal from the same county as James Still is also mentioned.

Keywords: American South; Education; Inverness (Ala.); James Still; Literature; Montgomery (Ala.); Segregation; Union Springs (Ala.)

Subjects: Education.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature.; Segregation.; Still, James, 1906-2001

00:20:54 - Moving to Troy for college

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Partial Transcript: You say you went off to, uh, Troy, to go to college.

Segment Synopsis: Hall further discusses his need to get away from home and to go to college (then Troy State Teachers College), including the conditions in which he had to live at his aunt's house to be able to afford it. Nevertheless, he was excited to live in a larger town, to go to college, to have an allowance, and to go to the cinema regularly.

Keywords: Inverness (Ala.); Montgomery (Ala.); Troy (Ala.); Troy University (Troy, Ala.); Union Springs (Ala.)

Subjects: Education; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature; Troy University (Troy, Ala.)

00:26:25 - Culture shock in a college town

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Partial Transcript: Oh, lemme tell you the first day I went to school.

Segment Synopsis: Hall tells stories from the culture shock he experienced when registering for college (having an advisor, choosing his class, etc.) and living with his aunt in town (answering the phone, pronunciation, etc.), and the help he received from an older student who helped him adapt to city life and "to the twentieth century."

Keywords: Education; Literature; Troy (Ala.); Troy University (Troy, Ala.)

Subjects: Education.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature.; Troy University (Troy, Ala.)

00:32:43 - College classes / English professors at Troy

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Partial Transcript: What do you remember about your college classes, and did you major in English?

Segment Synopsis: Hall discusses his initial decision to major in mathematics, and then his switch to English based on the quality of the professors in that department. From there he compares two of the more notable teachers and their life stories. He also briefly mentions his teaching at a junior high school in Opp, Alabama the year after graduation.

Keywords: Education; Literature; Opp (Ala.); Troy (Ala.); Troy University (Troy, Ala.)

Subjects: Education.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature.; Troy University (Troy, Ala.)

00:37:09 - Development of his interest in writing

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Partial Transcript: You said, in college, you--is that where you really developed your interest in English then?

Segment Synopsis: Hall talks about an encouraging English teacher he had in junior high school, as well as an oratorical contest he entered in high school to help himself overcome his stutter. This leads into a discussion of his complete lack of guidance, his father's lack of education, and how stifling it was to live at home.

Keywords: Alabama writers; Education; Inverness (Ala.); Kentucky writers; Literature; Montgomery (Ala.); Troy (Ala.); Troy University (Troy, Ala.); Union Springs (Ala.)

Subjects: Education.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature.; Troy University (Troy, Ala.)

00:44:32 - Teaching junior high school in Opp, Alabama / time in the army

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Partial Transcript: Right after college, you did not go on to graduate school directly, did you--you went to teach in the school?

Segment Synopsis: Hall talks about his year teaching junior high school English and social studies in Opp, Alabama, the discipline he forced on them that the students were not used to, and how he got himself drafted into the winding down of the Korean War at age 20. At this point he didn't know whether he wanted to stay in secondary school teaching. In the army, he worked as a supply sergeant in Heidelberg, Germany, in a highly educated unit.

Keywords: Education; Heidelberg (Germany); Korean War; Literature; Opp (Ala.)

Subjects: Education.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Korean War, 1950-1953; Literature.

00:49:27 - On ambition and choosing to be a college teacher

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Partial Transcript: Was there anything that you were exposed to in Germany or Europe that influenced you to teach on the college level, do you think?

Segment Synopsis: Hall talks about childhood ambition and the influence of the other men in his unit in Germany on his decision to be a college teacher and thus go to grad school. He also speaks further on his culture shock upon moving to Troy for college.

Keywords: Education; Inverness (Ala.); Korean War; Literature; Segregation; Troy (Ala.); Union Springs (Ala.); University of Alabama; University of Illinois

Subjects: Education.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Korean War, 1950-1953; Literature.; Segregation.; University of Alabama; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

00:55:50 - Development of his interest in Southern literature

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Partial Transcript: Uh, was your concentration then in Medieval Studies the whole time or--?

Segment Synopsis: Hall discusses the development of his interest in the literature of the American South on an academic level, beginning with his freshman year at Troy University and the history professors there that stimulated his interest in Southern history. He further talks about the differing perceived progressivism of the two English professors mentioned in an earlier segment.

Keywords: American South; Education; Literature; Racism; Segregation; Southern literature; Thomas Wolfe

Subjects: American South.; Education.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature.; Racism.; Segregation.; Wolfe, Thomas, 1900-1938.

01:02:53 - Time at the University of Illinois

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Partial Transcript: Well, after the University of Alabama, what decided you on the University of Illinois as a place to get your doctorate?

Segment Synopsis: Hall talks about his decision to go to the University of Illinois to complete his doctorate. He talks about the lady he stayed with who liked renting rooms to graduate students from the Deep South. He taught full-time and completed his doctorate in four years. He also talks about his professors and his advisor.

Keywords: American South; University of Alabama; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Subjects: Education.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature.; University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign campus)

01:06:40 - His dissertation on Southern literary humor

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Partial Transcript: My adviser was, was John Flanaghan, uh, who was from Minnesota.

Segment Synopsis: Hall discusses writing his doctoral dissertation on Southern literary humor between the Civil War and World War I.

Keywords: American South; American literature; Civil War; Ernest Hemingway; Folklore; Humor; Joel Chandler Harris; Southern literature; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; William Faulkner; World War I

Subjects: American South.; Civil war; Education.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Harris, Joel Chandler, 1848-1908.; History.; Literature.; University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign campus); World War, 1914-1918

01:12:53 - Southern humor itself

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Partial Transcript: What about the nature of the humor itself?

Segment Synopsis: Hall discusses Southern humor itself, how he perceives it, where it can be found, what constitutes it, and the importance of that humor. He also talks about his lack of belief in the legitimacy of Loyal Jones' Appalachian "joke books" as actual folklore.

Keywords: Alabama writers; American South; Folklore; Humor; Kentucky writers; Southern literature

Subjects: American South.; Folklore.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Jones, Loyal, 1928-; Literature.

01:21:10 - Publishing his dissertation as "The Smiling Phoenix" / his early academic career at Illinois and the University of Florida

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Partial Transcript: Well, th--when you were still in graduate school then, when you had your first book published?

Segment Synopsis: On a whim, Hall submitted his doctoral dissertation for publication to the University of Florida Press as a new professor there. Part of it was initially published in a relevant monograph series, and the whole thing was published later. He also talks about the first articles he ever had published as a fledgling academic.

Keywords: American South; Literature; Southern literature; University of Florida; University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Subjects: American South.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature.; University of Florida; University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign campus)

01:27:34 - Moving to Louisville to work at Kentucky Southern College

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Partial Transcript: How many years were you there?

Segment Synopsis: Hall only worked at the University of Florida for a year and a half before he accepted a job at the then-new (and now-nonexistent) Kentucky Southern College. The college was affiliated with the Southern Baptist Church, which he attended and was how he received the job offer to begin with. In this segment, he also talks about briefly living in his aunt's apartment building in Troy, Alabama between his jobs and the varying opinions he got on his decision to move.

Keywords: Gainesville (Fla.); Kentucky Southern College; Louisville (Ky.); Troy (Ala.); University of Florida

Subjects: Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Kentucky Southern College; Literature.

01:33:57 - Kentucky Southern College

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Partial Transcript: And the college was located where in Louisville?

Segment Synopsis: Hall joined the faculty of Kentucky Southern College as head of the department the second semester they were open. The school ultimately closed due to monetary reasons despite being, according to Hall, very successful due to the quality of its students, and he moved on to Bellarmine. The differing relationships between Kentucky Southern, Bellarmine, and the University of Louisville are also discussed, as well as his relative freedom teaching at both Kentucky Southern and Bellarmine.

Keywords: Bellarmine University; Kentucky Southern College

Subjects: Education.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature.

01:38:26 - Going to teach at Bellarmine

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Partial Transcript: Uh, and I've had a certain amount of freedom at both schools.

Segment Synopsis: Hall discusses teaching at Bellarmine, continuing on from the last segment talking about the pros and cons of teaching a small college (albeit in a large city). He teaches American literature and occasionally creative writing and a Kentucky studies course of his own invention. He also discusses the importance of teachers being professionally active in their fields, and thus why he continues to write even while teaching full-time.

Keywords: Alabama writers; Bellarmine University; Bellarmine-Ursuline College; Education; Kentucky writers; Literature

Subjects: Education.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature.

01:47:07 - Running the Kentucky Poetry Review

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Partial Transcript: I know you publish the Kentucky Poetry Review there.

Segment Synopsis: The "Kentucky Poetry Review" was founded as "Approaches" in 1964 in Elizabethtown to focus on Kentucky poetry. When the founder stepped down, Hall took over and made several changes with the founder's permission--making each issue associated with a particular poet. He talks about dedicating issues to various poets, including science fiction writer Ray Bradbury.

Keywords: Alabama writers; David Madden; James Dickey; Jesse Stuart; Kentucky Poetry Review; Kentucky writers; May Sarton; Ray Bradbury; Reynolds Price; Wendell Berry

Subjects: Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature.; Poetry.

01:54:28 - Kentucky Poetry Review in 1991

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Partial Transcript: So, it's been fun.

Segment Synopsis: Hall discusses the then-present time for the "Kentucky Poetry Review," including the sorts of poets he publishes and the people he corresponds with.

Keywords: Alabama writers; Kentucky Poetry Review; Kentucky writers; Literature; Poetry

Subjects: Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Kentucky--In literature.; Literature.; Poetry.

02:02:47 - Contemporary Kentucky writers / other Southern literature

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Partial Transcript: Uh, as someone who is a writer and an editor and an interviewer and a professor, do you see any new directions for Kentucky writers or Kentucky writing?

Segment Synopsis: When asked, Hall discusses his thoughts on the comparative fertility of Kentucky as a place to write about.

Keywords: Alabama writers; American South; Barbara Kingsolver; Eudora Welty; Kentucky writers; Reynolds Price; Southern literature; Tennessee Williams; William Faulkner

Subjects: American South.; American literature--Kentucky--History and criticism.; American literature--Kentucky.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Kentucky--In literature.

02:08:13 - Meeting Eudora Welty

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Partial Transcript: You, you mentioned meeting Eudora Welty last summer.

Segment Synopsis: Hall tells a story of how a review he wrote of a Eudora Welty book got passed onto the author herself through Jesse Stuart, leading to him meeting her and giving her a jar of fig preserves.

Keywords: American South; Eudora Welty; Kentucky writers; Literature; Southern literature

Subjects: American South.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature.

02:17:08 - Getting a signed copy of "To Kill a Mockingbird"

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Partial Transcript: I, I would, try not to make myself a nuisance.

Segment Synopsis: Hall tells a story of going to Harper Lee's hometown of Monroeville, Alabama with some friends (the same ones who went by Eudora Welty's), seeing the courthouse, introducing himself to Lee's sister, and getting a signed copy of "To Kill a Mockingbird."

Keywords: American South; Harper Lee; Mobile (Ala.); Monroeville (Ala.); Southern literature

Subjects: American South.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Lee, Harper.; Literature.

02:21:08 - Meeting William Bradford Huie

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Partial Transcript: One time I stopped by and visited with, uh, William Bradford Huie.

Segment Synopsis: Hall tells a story of a time he and a friend of his got to spend an entire afternoon with William Bradford Huie, all the things they talked about, and how he very briefly aided Huie with his investigative journalism.

Keywords: William Bradford Huie

Subjects: Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Huie, William Bradford, 1910-1986.

02:23:32 - Meeting Kentucky writers / Jesse Stuart as a person

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Partial Transcript: I tried not to be too, too forward.

Segment Synopsis: Hall talks about knowing Jesse Stuart, as well as his thoughts on the lack of critique on Stuart, considering Stuart a better person than he was a writer (a very high compliment, however, in Hall's mind). Stuart was also wildly productive, in addition to keeping up intense correspondence.

Keywords: Jesse Stuart; Kentucky writers

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Kentucky--In literature.; Stuart, Jesse, 1906-1984

02:31:16 - Stuart's value as a writer / more on the Kentucky Poetry Review

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Partial Transcript: And, uh, but he was never accepted by the avant-garde.

Segment Synopsis: Hall discusses how Stuart was viewed even in his time as an old-fashioned writer whose work was "very uneven," some good, some bad; and how he perceived Stuart as having been a fairly bad poet. This leads briefly back to the "Kentucky Poetry Review," and then back to Stuart and the masses' great admiration for him.

Keywords: Alabama writers; Hal Richardson; Jesse Stuart; Kentucky Poetry Review; Kentucky writers; Robert Burns

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Kentucky--In literature.; Literature.; Poetry.; Stuart, Jesse, 1906-1984

02:38:04 - Stuart's productivity and personality

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Partial Transcript: He was a wonderful speaker, because of his enthusiasm.

Segment Synopsis: Hall contrasts James Still and Jesse Stuart, declaring Still "lazy" but a better writer overall compared to the wildly productive Stuart. This leads into a further discussion of Stuart's personality and how devastating it was for his friends to see him after his stroke.

Keywords: Alabama writers; James Still; Jesse Stuart; Kentucky writers

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Kentucky--In literature.; Literature.; Poetry.; Stuart, Jesse, 1906-1984

02:41:40 - Knowing Harriet Arnow

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Partial Transcript: But, but Ha--I loved Ha, Harriet Arnow, too. Did you ever meet Harriet?

Segment Synopsis: Hall talks about knowing poet Harriet Arnow, describing her physical presence ("like a little granny lady from the mountains") and personality, and telling some stories. One of the stories included her smoking habit, which she developed as a student at Berea College (she thought that since there was a $50 fine for smoking on campus, it must be "mighty good" to warrant such a fee).

Keywords: Harriet Arnow

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky.; Arnow, Harriette Louisa Simpson, 1908-1986; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Kentucky--In literature.; Literature.; Poetry.

02:46:56 - Knowing James Still

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Partial Transcript: Uh, you mentioned also James Still, a minute ago.

Segment Synopsis: Hall gives his opinion on Still as a person and as a writer, declaring him brilliant and likeable but lazy. He also mentions Still's poetry (which he likes), poetic prose, and life in relative isolation at the Hindman Settlement School.

Keywords: Alabama writers; James Still; Kentucky Poetry Review; Kentucky writers; Literature; Louisville (Ky.); Poetry

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Kentucky--In literature.; Literature.; Poetry.; Still, James, 1906-2001

02:53:52 - On his own poetry / ambition / love

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Partial Transcript: I wanted to ask you--uh, back to your writing--uh, about your book of poetry, uh, "The High Limb."

Segment Synopsis: When asked, Hall talks about his own poetry, his first poem (for his father), a poem he wrote about "meeting" his dead poet friend in a bookshop in Cincinnati, and his graduate school ambition "to be a footnote" (that is, to be viewed as an authority on something)--and a poem a friend of his wrote on that. When asked, he also briefly talks about his poem "The Terror of Loving."

Keywords: James Laughlin; Literature; Poetry

Subjects: Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature.; Poetry.

02:59:53 - Conducting an oral history of Lyman T. Johnson

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Partial Transcript: Can you tell me about writing "The Rest of the Dream"?

Segment Synopsis: Hall discusses a decision to conduct an oral biography of educator Lyman T. Johnson, and talks about oral history as a creative process on the part of the interviewer.

Keywords: Literature; Louisville (Ky.); Lyman Johnson; Lyman T. Johnson; Oral biographies; Oral histories; Oral history

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky.; Johnson, Lyman T., 1906-1997; Kentucky--In literature.

03:05:58 - Publishing the Johnson biography

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Partial Transcript: I decided to focus on it; I finished it up.

Segment Synopsis: Hall talks about the process of finishing up and getting published the Lyman T. Johnson biography, and then discusses the finished result, as perceived by him, who thought the University of Kentucky Press did a poor job with it, by Johnson, who greatly approved of it, and by critics, who gave good reviews or said that he didn't properly explain his interviewing/writing process. Johnson himself said that they both were needed to write the book, because of Hall's perspective as a Southern white man.

Keywords: Alabama writers; Kentucky writers; Louisville (Ky.); Lyman Johnson; Lyman T. Johnson

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Johnson, Lyman T., 1906-1997; Kentucky--In literature.

03:13:15 - Oral history as a form of creative writing

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Partial Transcript: Now, the book I'm working on now, in--my Alabama book--

Segment Synopsis: Hall speaks further on oral history as a creative process on the part of the interviewer, while talking about a book he's working on about the history of his home county. He also discusses the struggle of conveying dialect while maintaining the dignity of the speaker through literature. He gives an example of an interviewed man who was actually named June the Eleventh Harvey.

Keywords: Oral biographies; Oral histories; Oral history

Subjects: Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; History.; Literature.

03:21:22 - His aunt Elma Lee / folk wisdom

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Partial Transcript: I have an aunt, one of my aunts who--not Beansie but one named Elma Lee. E-l-m-a-l-double-e.

Segment Synopsis: Hall talks about his aunts, Elma Lee, a maiden lady who died at almost age 90, and Beansie, who was married.

Keywords: Alabama writers; Dialect; History; Kentucky writers

Subjects: Dialect.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; History.; Literature.

03:27:32 - Playwriting / writing fiction about one's hometown

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Partial Transcript: I don't know, but, um--

Segment Synopsis: Going off talking about having the monologues from his book on the history of his home county being performed as dramatic readings, he speaks briefly on his playwriting, and then discusses the uniqueness of writing fiction about one's home town.

Keywords: Actors Theatre of Louisville; Alabama writers; Inverness (Ala.); Kentucky writers; Louisville (Ky.); Playwriting; Union Springs (Ala.)

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky.; Anderson, Mary 1985-1940; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Kentucky--In literature.; Literature.; Theatre.

03:33:07 - On creativity / why creative people create

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Partial Transcript: How do you feel about creativity?

Segment Synopsis: When asked, Hall gives his views on why writers and other creative people write and create--that they are naturally maladjusted people who feel something is missing.

Keywords: Alabama writers; Kentucky writers; Thomas Mann

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Kentucky--In literature.

03:39:10 - Being happy in his hometown / the meaning of "home"

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Partial Transcript: Well, see, my aunt, my aunt Elma Lee--the one who lived to be almost ninety, and who never drove a car, never spent more than, well, a few nights away from home.

Segment Synopsis: Hall returns to talking about his aunt Elma Lee, whom he considered intelligent, but was completely fine living and dying "in sight of where she was born." This leads to him talking about how he thinks he could now return to his home county and live now that he's been out, as well as the decline in population there.

Keywords: Alabama writers; Kentucky writers

Subjects: Families.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015

03:44:20 - Burial and death

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Partial Transcript: I'll be buried in my home cemetery.

Segment Synopsis: Hall discusses his idea on the meaning of home as the place where you'll be buried. This leads into his distinctly "country" views on death--as an ever-present reality that must be prepared for.

Keywords: Death; Home

Subjects: Hall, Wade, 1934-2015

03:49:50 - "Wade Hall's Kentucky Desk" television show

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Partial Transcript: Uh, just wanted to ask you about a couple of more things.

Segment Synopsis: Hall talks about hosting a television show broadcast to Louisville in which he interviewed anyone he considered "interesting." His inspiration was the interviewing style he had witnessed, in which the interviewer didn't do any research into the person's life and thus couldn't talk to the person in any depth.

Keywords: Interviews; Louisville (Ky.); Television shows

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Kentucky--In literature.; Television programs

04:01:50 - His collection of Southern books and papers

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Partial Transcript: Uh, I, I have given my southern collec--I am--I'm a collector of books--

Segment Synopsis: Hall talks about his collection of Southern books and papers, interviewing the University of Alabama Special Collections curator on Louisville television, and his goal to have a signed copy of a book by every major Southern author through "creative swapping."

Keywords: Southern authors; Southern writers

Subjects: Hall, Wade, 1934-2015

04:06:49 - His letter and journal collection

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Partial Transcript: I've collected letters for a long time.

Segment Synopsis: Hall talks about his collection of letters and diaries, how he came across them, and give some examples of the content--the personalization of history by ordinary people.

Keywords: Civil War; Ken Burns

Subjects: Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865.

04:11:27 - His diary collection / peoples' interest in his collection

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Partial Transcript: I just love to re--and I love diaries.

Segment Synopsis: Hall discusses his diary collection, gives further examples of how he came into possession of letters, and tells stories of peoples' interest in his collection.

Keywords: Alabama writers; Diaries; Kentucky writers

Subjects: American literature--Kentucky.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Kentucky--In literature.

04:15:34 - Collecting primitive art

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Partial Transcript: Well, just--

Segment Synopsis: The interviewer and Hall talk about the "strangeness" of his house, which is full of antiques and primitive art. This leads into a discussion of why and how he collects primitive art and quilts.

Keywords: Alabama writers; Art; Collections; Kentucky writers; Quilting

Subjects: Art.; Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Quilts.

04:19:47 - When and why he collects / collecting as an art

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Partial Transcript: When did you start collecting all you collect?

Segment Synopsis: Hall talks about how he started collecting things of all sorts, and how it branched off from keeping a lot of books. This leads into a discussion of the art of collecting things--both on the "wheeling and dealing" side and the creating a whole out of parts side.

Keywords: Alabama writers; Kentucky writers

Subjects: Hall, Wade, 1934-2015; Literature.