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00:00:18 - His early life

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Partial Transcript: Well, let's start at the beginning.

Segment Synopsis: The interviewer asks Daingerfield about his early life in Lexington, Kentucky, his time at the former Massie School, and his brief stint at the University of Virginia. From there, he talks about his idea of studying law like his grandfather, a lawyer-turned-Confederate general, as well as a skilled horseman. His middle name, Keene, came from the Keenes of Keeneland, but he doubts anything greater than peripheral relation to them.

Keywords: Horsemanship; Keeneland; Lexington (Ky.); Robert K. Massie; Robert Massie; University of Virginia

Subjects: Horsemanship.; Keeneland (Lexington, Ky.); Lexington (Ky.); Massie, Robert K., 1929-; University of Virginia

00:06:40 - Origin of name "Daingerfield" / His grandfather and James R. Keene's Castleton Farm

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Partial Transcript: Where does the name Daingerfield come from?

Segment Synopsis: Daingerfield discusses the origin of his surname, a Norman French name. From there, he hypothesizes about the history of his family, which comes from England by way of Virginia, and also confirms the spelling as 'Daingerfield'. This history of his family brings his grandfather (Foxhall Alexander Daingerfield) from Virginia to Kentucky to manage his brother-in-law's farm, Castleton, which he describes as the Calumet of its time. He also talks briefly and kindly of his father, also named James Keene Daingerfield.

Keywords: Foxhall Alexander Daingerfield; James R. Keene; Keene Daingerfield; Keeneland; Lexington (Ky.)

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Keene, James R. (James Robert), 1838-1913.; Lexington (Ky.)

00:12:28 - Elizabeth Daingerfield's induction into the horse industry

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Partial Transcript: Uh, my aunt Elizabeth, in her youth, was very delicate and she suffered from what used to be called consumption.

Segment Synopsis: Daingerfield talks about his aunt Elizabeth's troubles in her youth with tuberculosis, how she traveled around the world trying to get well, moved back to Castleton Farm, where her father was the manager, and spent all her time outdoors with him, apparently prompting her recovery. He then describes her sheer physical strength by adulthood, and her knowledge of pedigrees and skill at breeding and caring for horses, contrasted with ineptitude as a businessperson.

Keywords: Elizabeth Daingerfield; Horse farms; Horsemanship; Keene Daingerfield; Lexington (Ky.)

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse farms--Kentucky.; Horse farms.; Horsemanship.; Lexington (Ky.)

00:15:55 - Elizabeth's association with Samuel Riddle and Kingston Farm

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Partial Transcript: Well, was she working, um, at Castleton for her father?

Segment Synopsis: Daingerfield describes how Elizabeth came to be associated with Kingston Farm as well as Samuel Riddle (famous for owning the racehorse, Man o' War). Kingston Farm was bought by the partners at the Cleveland-based Corrigan-McKinney Steel Co., and didn't stay in business very long.

Keywords: Corrigan-McKinney Steel Co.; Corrigan-McKinney Steel Company; Elizabeth Daingerfield; Horse farms; Horse industry; Horsemanship; Keene Daingerfield; Lexington (Ky.); Samuel Doyle Riddle; Samuel Riddle

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse farms--Kentucky.; Horse farms.; Horse industry.; Horsemanship.; Lexington (Ky.); Riddle, Samuel Doyle, 1861-1951.

00:20:10 - Elizabeth's breeding operations / Further farm management

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Partial Transcript: After that, as I say, my, my aunt, had bred some horses on a small scale quite successfully.

Segment Synopsis: Daingerfield describes his aunt's own activities breeding and managing horses, her partnership with an owner in Washington, and how she came to the attention of Samuel Riddle and Walter Jeffords, partners in horse racing. She bought her own farm, and designed Kingston Farm and Jeffords' farm, Faraway Farm.

Keywords: Elizabeth Daingerfield; Horse farms; Horse industry; Horsemanship; Keene Daingerfield; Lexington (Ky.); Samuel Doyle Riddle; Samuel Riddle; Shandon Farm; Thoroughbred horse; Walter Jeffords; Walter M. Jeffords

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse farms--Kentucky.; Horse farms.; Horsemanship.; Jeffords, Walter Morrison, 1883-1960.; Lexington (Ky.); Riddle, Samuel Doyle, 1861-1951.; Thoroughbred horse--Breeding; Thoroughbred horse--Breeding--Kentucky.; Thoroughbred horse.; Women in horse sports

00:25:18 - Elizabeth Daingerfield as a person

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Partial Transcript: She was, I think, always essentially lady-like, but also pretty damn tough.

Segment Synopsis: Daingerfield discusses his aunt as a person--lady-like but tough and eccentric, going to plays and dinner parties wearing nice gowns but also moccasins and carrying a derringer. She was particular about horse breeding, but had cats and dogs of "every conceivable mismating". Furthermore, he describes her as probably very hard to work for.

Keywords: Elizabeth Daingerfield; Horse farms; Horse industry; Horsemanship; Keene Daingerfield; Lexington (Ky.)

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse farms--Kentucky.; Horse farms.; Horse industry.; Horsemanship.; Lexington (Ky.); Women in horse sports

00:31:09 - His childhood interest in Thoroughbred racing

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Partial Transcript: When did you start showing a major interest in horses?

Segment Synopsis: Despite having a pony, Daingerfield wasn't very interested in riding as a child, but developed an interest in racing (more specifically what he calls "running races", as opposed to harness races) at an early age. When asked about showing horses, he states nobody in Central Kentucky then really cared about show horses (Saddlebreds), and he still doesn't care about them. His mother had no horse background and cared about horses only at the races. He explains going with his mother to pick his father up from the Kentucky Association Track and getting to see the last race of the day, and how he was smuggled into the family box on Saturdays, and also describes the first jockey he ever met.

Keywords: American Saddlebred horse; Horse farms; Horse industry; Horse racing; Horsemanship; Keene Daingerfield; Kentucky Association Track; Lexington (Ky.); Race horses; Thoroughbred horse

Subjects: American saddlebred horse.; Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse farms--Kentucky.; Horse farms.; Horse racing--Kentucky.; Horse racing.; Horsemanship.; Lexington (Ky.); Race horses.; Thoroughbred horse.

00:37:07 - His early professional involvement with horses

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Partial Transcript: Can you remember when she sent you to New York?

Segment Synopsis: Daingerfield describes being sent by his aunt to the Saratoga Springs, New York yearling sales at age 15, and how he was taken care of by Elizabeth Jeffords. From there the interviewer inquires about how he went from studying to be a lawyer at University of Virginia to working with horses professionally. Daingerfield talks about his first horse, which was a high school graduation gift, a three year old filly named Joyland, as well as other specific horses, people, and races from his early professional involvement.

Keywords: Elizabeth Daingerfield; Horse farms; Horse industry; Horsemanship; Keene Daingerfield; Lexington (Ky.); Saratoga Springs (N.Y.); Walter Jeffords; Walter M. Jeffords

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse farms--Kentucky.; Horse farms.; Horse industry.; Horsemanship.; Jeffords, Walter Morrison, 1883-1960.; Saratoga Springs (N.Y.); Thoroughbred horse.

00:46:13 - The Great Depression's effects on the horse industry / Differences between "then and now"

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Partial Transcript: And I was not necessarily preparing for you, but I was going through some journals and records.

Segment Synopsis: Daingerfield discusses the Great Depression's effects on the horse industry, describing 1934 as the depth of the depression for racing. Breeders had started suffering fairly quickly, but racetracks held up pretty well for a couple years after because people still had savings to go bet at the track. He then talks about how his old records showed he made $1700 in 1934, which seems like very little, but was enough to survive on back then, especially because he was very careful with his money. Furthermore, he was a trainer, paying his help.

Keywords: Great Depression; Horse breeders; Horse farms; Horse industry; Horse racing; Keene Daingerfield; Lexington (Ky.); Race horses; Racetracks

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Depressions--1929; Horse farms.; Horse racing--Kentucky.; Horse racing.; Lexington (Ky.); Race horses.; Racetracks (Horse racing); Thoroughbred horse.

00:49:49 - His first time making money

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Partial Transcript: Uh, the first race, and this is something that I will obviously never forget.

Segment Synopsis: Daingerfield tells a story of a client of his aunt's, a New York City stockbroker named Benjamin Block, who bought the horse Morvich, who would win the 1922 Kentucky Derby and to whom his aunt bred all sorts of "abstruse" mares, producing "good poor-man's horses". He trained one of these resulting horses, which won enough money for him to get married.

Keywords: Benjamin Block; Elizabeth Daingerfield; Horse industry; Horse owners; Horse racing; Horsemanship; Keene Daingerfield; Lexington (Ky.); Race horses; Racetracks; Thoroughbred horse

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse owners; Horse racing--Kentucky.; Horse racing.; Horsemanship.; Lexington (Ky.); Race horses.; Racetracks (Horse racing); Thoroughbred horse.

00:55:03 - More on his early years racing / More on differences between generations

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Partial Transcript: We got you about maybe the age where you first married.

Segment Synopsis: Dangerfield continues the next part of his life, and tells a story about Jack Keene (the man behind Keeneland) and a dispute involving his chickens and another horseman. From there, he discusses the importance of manners and diplomacy in dealing with one's elders.

Keywords: C. C. van Meter; Horse industry; Horse racing; Jack Keene; John Oliver "Jack" Keene; John Oliver Keene; Keene Daingerfield; Keeneland; Racehorses; Racetracks; Steve Judge; Thoroughbred horse; W. T. Bishop

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse racing--Kentucky.; Horse racing.; Keeneland (Lexington, Ky.); Lexington (Ky.); Race horses.; Race tracks (Horse racing); Thoroughbred horse

01:03:48 - Transitioning from training horses for 15 years to becoming a racing steward

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Partial Transcript: Well, tell me about training horses in those days.

Segment Synopsis: Daingerfield talks about his progression from being a trainer to a racing steward. He talks about the importance of a "judicial temperament" to that job, and says that if you have a "judicial temperament" you should be a judge of some sort. He then discusses what he perceives to have been too much authority given to racing stewards and too little given them today.

Keywords: Ben Jones; Horse industry; Horse racing; Horse trainers; Keene Daingerfield; Lexington (Ky.); Race horses; Racing stewards; Thoroughbred horse

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse racing--Kentucky.; Horse racing--Law and legislation; Horse racing--Rules.; Horse racing.; Horse trainers.; Jones, Benjamin Allyn, 1882-1961; Race horses.; Thoroughbred horse.

01:09:44 - Differences across the years of authority of racing stewards / Decline in quality of everybody associated with racing

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Partial Transcript: Well, I don't, as--again, I'll repeat.

Segment Synopsis: Daingerfield goes more in depth into the discussion of racing stewards' authority across the decades, saying that he thinks that if they make good rulings, they will eventually be properly respected again. He then states that the advent of year-round racing has diluted the quality of competence of horses, trainers, jockeys, and stewards, making it more difficult to get the right people for the job. From there, he discusses specific issues with calls of recent racing officials.

Keywords: Horse racing; Horsemanship; Keene Daingerfield; Race horses; Racing officials; Racing stewards; Thoroughbred horse

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse industry.; Horse racing--Law and legislation; Horse racing--Records.; Horse racing--Rules.; Horse racing.; Horsemanship.; Race horses.; Thoroughbred horse.

01:16:58 - Differences in horse industry then and now

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Partial Transcript: Well, um, besides the changes in, in, in stewards and in, in the higher offices of racing like that, from the time you first became a steward in the late 1940s until now, what, besides the actual growth of the business, are the, the biggest differences between being a horseperson then and being a horseperson now?

Segment Synopsis: Daingerfield talks about how with the growth of the industry, racetracks have become more anonymous and you don't know everybody like you used to, which he considers an improvement away from their former clique-ish nature. He declares that they've always been people, and anybody who is good, regardless of their generation, could have succeeded whatever decade they were placed in.

Keywords: Horse industry; Horse racing; Horse trainers; Horsemanship; Keene Daingerfield; Racehorses; Racetracks; Thoroughbred horse

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse industry.; Horse racing.; Horse trainers.; Horsemanship.; Race horses.; Racetracks (Horse racing); Thoroughbred horse.

01:22:50 - Drugging in the horse industry as represented in the media

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Partial Transcript: On, just on the same theme, what other sweeping changes do you see right now?

Segment Synopsis: The interviewer asks Daingerfield for his thoughts on the then-topical (having warranted a "60 Minutes" segment, for which he was interviewed) subject of doping in the horse industry. Daingerfield describes the segment as factually correct, but ultimately an unfair representation, stating that it's always been a problem, and one with no simple answer. Quoting a veterinarian he knows, he says that horses that run the Kentucky Derby have been shown to be less likely to be medicated than regular race horses because they're better horses who don't need it.

Keywords: Doping in horse racing; Horse racing; Horsemanship; Keene Daingerfield; Racehorses; Thoroughbred horse

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Doping in horse racing; Horse racing--Law and legislation; Horse racing--Rules.; Horse racing.; Horsemanship.; Horses--Health.; Race horses.; Racetracks (Horse racing); Thoroughbred horse.

01:36:22 - Off-track betting

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Partial Transcript: What other, um, major problems beset racing right now in 1979?

Segment Synopsis: The interviewer asks Daingerfield about the rising prevalence of off-track betting, and he explains what could be the future of racing as a result of that--a reduction of the number of tracks to the point racing, now more exclusive, would be great for a few years. However, he explains, many people would lose their jobs, and breeding would become ridiculously limited and quality of horses would fall down again. He then presents a fairly radical idea that off-track betting is immoral, due to the potential of hurting small tracks.

Keywords: Horse industry; Horse racing; Keene Daingerfield; Racehorses; Racetracks; Thoroughbred horse

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse industry.; Horse racing--Betting.; Horse racing.; Race horses.; Racetracks (Horse racing); Thoroughbred horse.

01:44:20 - Resilience of horse racing

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Partial Transcript: From what I've seen in racing, and I'm no expert and I don't pretend to be, but they, uh, whenever there's-----?? of despair, there seems to be some way they work themselves out of it.

Segment Synopsis: The interviewer and Daingerfield discuss the resilience of the horse industry, due to the continual induction of people who care about it. Daingerfield then talks about the glamour of being a successful horse trainer and the resulting draw of the industry.

Keywords: Horse industry; Horse owners; Horse racing; Horse trainers; Horsemanship; Jockeys; Keene Daingerfield; Racehorses; Thoroughbred horse

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse industry.; Horse owners; Horse racing.; Horse trainers.; Horsemanship.; Jockeys; Race horses.; Thoroughbred horse.

01:48:23 - More history / Kentucky Thoroughbred Development Fund

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Partial Transcript: Well, we've covered a lot of ground.

Segment Synopsis: Daingerfield talks about what he perceives to have been the 'Golden Age' of Kentucky racing (between World War I and the Great Depression) and how great the Latonia Race Track was. From there, he and the interviewer discuss the importance of the new Kentucky Thoroughbred Development Fund, which was founded in 1978, and who all would benefit from it.

Keywords: Covington (Ky.); Horse breeders; Horse owners; Horse trainers; Keene Daingerfield; Kentucky Thoroughbred Development Fund; Latonia Race Track; Lexington (Ky.); Thoroughbred horse

Subjects: Covington (Ky.); Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse industry.; Horse racing--Kentucky; Horse racing.; Lexington (Ky.); Race horses.; Thoroughbred horse--Breeding; Thoroughbred horse--Breeding--Kentucky.; Thoroughbred horse.

01:53:18 - Important cases in his racing stewardship career

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Partial Transcript: What about, um, what about monumental cases you've been involved with?

Segment Synopsis: Daingerfield discusses a racing dispute he oversaw that involved the famous race horse Dr. Fager in the Jersey Derby.

Keywords: Dr. Fager; Horse racing; Keene Daingerfield; Racehorses; Racetracks; Racing officials; Racing stewards

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Dr. Fager (Race horse); Horse racing--Law and legislation; Horse racing--Rules.; Horse racing.; Horsemanship.; Race horses.; Race tracks (Horse racing)

01:59:30 - Avoiding bias as a steward

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Partial Transcript: But later on in the same year, there was a perfectly terrible man named--maybe a year later--William H. Rogers.

Segment Synopsis: Daingerfield describes a situation where he and other stewards had to call in favor of the horse of a "terrible" man involved in race fixing over the horse of a "nice" man, who was about to lose his farm. From there, he discusses other difficulties with judging races, avoiding calling based on personalities of owners and trainers involved, even when it's hard.

Keywords: Horse owners; Horse racing; Horse trainers; Keene Daingerfield; Keeneland; Racehorses; Racing officials; Racing stewards; Thoroughbred horse

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse owners; Horse racing--Law and legislation; Horse racing--Rules.; Horse racing.; Horse trainers.; Keeneland (Lexington, Ky.); Race horses.; Thoroughbred horse.

02:07:07 - Determining penalties as a steward / Immorality of stewards and race fixing

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Partial Transcript: But there are other instances where it helps to know the gray area.

Segment Synopsis: Daingerfield talks about the gray area of stewardship--determining the penalties--for which they take into account a person's past actions. For instance, a man is less likely to get a severe penalty if it's his first offense. From there, he goes on to discuss stewards who broke the law and were involved in, among other things, race fixing. Up until the years immediately before this interview, he had never heard of overt corruption or major scandals involving stewards.

Keywords: Horse racing; Keene Daingerfield; Racehorses; Racetracks; Racing officials; Racing stewards; Thoroughbred horse

Subjects: Daingerfield, Keene, 1911-; Horse racing--Law and legislation; Horse racing--Rules.; Horse racing.; Race horses.; Race tracks (Horse racing); Thoroughbred horse.